“Everything in my mind isn’t mine.”

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They Lived Well

It may be impossible to accept it…and understandably so.  When it happens earlier than expected, it is even harder to fathom.  No time seems to be the right time…and yet it always comes.  Each of us knows at some point that it will.  Amongst all of God’s creation…we alone, are fully aware that our lives will come to and end.  Even though it is sad, sometimes unbearably sad, our awareness of the brevity of our lives is a blessing.  Knowing that we have a limited amount of time, to live, and to love, and accomplish,  gives us a sense of urgency, that we couldn’t have otherwise.  Knowing that our lives are but a “blink of an eye”, we have a chance to make this world a little better when we leave here, than it was when we got here.  We are all blessed by those who use the time they have, by living well. Some people hate it but I really enjoy Face Book.  However, occasionally there is a dark cloud…a certain heaviness, that hangs over the virtual community of Face Book.  Recently a young man, who was a father, a son, an uncle, and a friend passed away.  I didn’t know him…but I feel like, I wish I did.  So many pictures on display to document that this man lived well.  Pictures of him smiling, holding children, hanging with the fellas…managed to break through, if only slightly… the deep sadness of losing him.  I read stories of his generosity and kindness, and my heart breaks for the people who loved him, and now have to live on without him.  Clearly...

Free At Last?

On this day, I am one of many who will reflect, talk, meditate on, or write about one of our greatest citizens, Martin Luther King.  Born January 15, 1929, educated in our nations colleges, and polished to a razor sharp edge in violently protested peace marches and dirty jail cells.  MLK was a man with flaws, but in spite of those flaws he rose to speak to a nation that had lost it’s way.  America Home of the Free, had become any but that for many of it’s citizens.  A movement began to resist ungodly persecution, and an institutionalized apartheid, not unlike that found in South Africa.  A reluctant leader came to the fore to lead this so called civil rights movement, to help it achieve it’s righteous goal of peace and equality for people of color.  That leader became the voice of a people that had grown impatient and fully ready to claim it’s rightful place at the table of The American Dream. On August 28, 1963 between 250,000 to 400, 000 people gathered in Washington DC before the Lincoln Memorial to hear the keynote speaker of the March On Washington For Jobs And Freedom.  I don’t think anybody understood what they were about to witness.  This reluctant leader Martin Luther King gave what is widely believed to be one of the two or three greatest and most influential speeches ever given.  I Have A Dream is what he said.  He spoke in lofty often times thunderous words about his aspiration for our country.  He said that as great as our country was it could not achieve it’s...

That’s Just My Baby Daddy

I remember a time when the term ‘baby daddy’ didn’t exist…I know that dates me but that’s OK.  Back then the term for my ‘baby’s daddy’ was husband, but times have changed.  I heard a startling statistic on the radio today, it said that 50% of black women have a child out of wedlock before they are 20 years old.  I think this is tragic…but you wouldn’t know it by the way so many people react to a pregnancy.  There are the congratulations, the fancy baby showers and all.  For way too many people this has become the status-quo.  The problem however is that the status-quo is very problematic. If a young girl in her teens has a baby her chance of graduating high school is greatly diminished.  With that is the likelihood that this teen mother and her child will live in poverty.  With the stigma of poverty, and what is often substandard living conditions the child will grow up and repeat the cycle.  There is also the drain on our economy.  The boys  get these girls pregnant and don’t have the financial ability or sometimes even the will to contribute to their child’s upbringing, so cities and states have to pick up the tab and pay for these babies.  This is a burden that society shouldn’t have to bear, and increasingly can’t afford to bear. In lots of minority communities having a baby is a career option. Something has got to change. I try to never complain about a situation and not offer a solution, if for no other reason than to spark thought and conversation.  I’ll start with the girls. ...

A Wonderful Life

So…I’m on a job, and I ask the home owner what he did for a living.  He told me he worked for and retired from IBM.  He then volunteered this statement that really struck me, he said “We’ve had a wonderful life…my wife, our kids, three cats…we’ve really been lucky.”  As simple as that statement is, it’s equally unusual.  You’re more likely to hear someone say some version of “Same Sh^t different day” or some other complaint about how bad things are.  From time to time you may have someone tell you they’re “OK”, or “Fine”…but that’s usually about as good as it gets. So I started to wonder how it can be that this retired gentleman could live in the same state as me in the same recession that the rest of us are in and say he’s had a “wonderful life”?  I should have interviewed him but the timing didn’t seem appropriate.  So, I’m gonna tell you what I think (being that you’re here reading “The Mind Of KLH”).  I think this was a man who probably learned early in his life that you get out of it, what you put into it.  You go to school and study hard, then graduate high enough in your class to get recruited into a great company.  Once you start working you look for a potential spouse who can be a great partner and an even better parent.  Get married, spend less than you earn, save that money and then buy a nice house where you can raise your children.  Keep saving and send them to good schools so they...